EE501: An Introduction to the Theory of Statistical Communications

  1. Germain (Germ) Drolet
    Tel: (613) 541-6000, ext: 6192 (office S4100)
    Email: drolet-g@rmc.ca

  2. Two lectures per week (1 1/2 hours each):

  3. Marking scheme:
    4 or 5 quizzes totaling: 75%  
    Final: 25%  

  4. Textbook:
    J.M. Wozencraft, I.M. Jacobs, Principles of Communications Engineering, Waveland Press Inc., U.S.A., 1965 (reprinted 1990), ISBN 0-88133-554-1.

  5. Calendar Description:

    EE501: An Introduction to the Theory of Statistical Communications

    Formulation of the communications problem as a stochastic process; probability and random variables; expectations; moments; characteristic function; multi-variate distributions; stationarity and the ergodic theorem; ensemble and time averages. An introduction to optimum detection; the sampling theorem and efficient transmission of message sequences.

    Lectures - 3 periods a week (One Term)

    Piggybacks on an undergrad course: No

  6. Use of mathematical software is encouraged: MAPLE, MATHEMATICA, MATLAB, C language programming, ...

  7. Reminder ...
    Academic misconduct, including plagiarism, cheating, and other violations of academic ethics, is a serious academic infraction for which penalties may range from a recorded caution to expulsion from the College. The RMCC Academic Regulations Section 23 defines plagiarism as: ``Using the work of others and attempting to present it as original thought, prose or work. This includes failure to appropriately acknowledge a source, misrepresentation of cited work, and misuse of quotation marks or attribution.'' It also includes ``the failure to acknowledge that work has been submitted for credit elsewhere.'' All students should consult the published statements on Academic Misconduct contained in the Royal Military College of Canada Undergraduate Calendar, Section 23.

Resources:
Main notes
Formula sheets
Random processes may be classified according to some of their properties. Click here for a rough copy of a table of classification.
Solutions of the problems at the end of chapter 2 in the notes.
Solutions of the problems at the end of chapter 3 in the notes.
Solution of the problem at the end of chapter 4 in the notes.

Additional examples:
MAPLE worksheet for 3D plots of equation (2.58) in W&J
Table of some Fourier transform pairs

Audio samples of White Random Processes (Click here for a time-domain view of the signals):

Audio samples of Binary Random Processes (Click here for a time-domain view of the signals):

Quizes:
First Quiz (2015/09/29) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Second Quiz (2015/10/16) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Third Quiz (2015/11/03) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Fourth Quiz (2015/11/24) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Fifth Quiz (optional)

Final Exam (2015) $ \longrightarrow$ (solutions)


Quizes from past years:
First Quiz (2010) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
First Quiz (2011) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
First Quiz (2014/09/25) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions

Second Quiz (2010) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Second Quiz (2011) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Second Quiz (2014/10/16) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions

Third Quiz (2010) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Third Quiz (2011) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Third Quiz (2014/10/23) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions

Fourth Quiz (2010) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Fourth Quiz (2011) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions
Fourth Quiz (2014/11/20) $ \longrightarrow$ solutions

Fifth Quiz (2014)


Final Exams from past years:
Final Exam (2010) $ \longrightarrow$ (solutions)
Final Exam (2011) $ \longrightarrow$ (solutions)
Final Exam (2014) $ \longrightarrow$ (solutions)


Suggested problems in the textbook by Wozencraft & Jacobs:Problems in parenthesis are of lesser importance.

Chapter 2:
2.4, (2.5), 2.7, (2.8), 2.10, 2.11, 2.12, 2.14, 2.16, 2.17, 2.19, 2.20, (2.21), 2.23, 2.24, 2.25, (2.28), 2.30, 2.31, 2.34 (required for problem 3.15), (2.35), (2.37), 2.39 (uses some concepts of Coding Theory - we will expand on this in Chapter 5) $ \longrightarrow$ Solutions
Better solution Problem 2.25

Chapter 3:
3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6, (3.7), 3.8 (question (a) of lesser importance), 3.9, 3.11(c), (3.15), (3.16), (3.17), 3.18. $ \longrightarrow$ Solutions

Chapter 4:
4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 4.9, 4.11, 4.12, 4.15 $ \longrightarrow$ Solutions

External link:
Tutorial on probabilities: http://www.sci.utah.edu/~gerig/CS6640-F2010/prob-tut.pdf





Germain Drolet 2016-08-07